Rescue The Democratic PR Machine!

The federal government has come to the rescue of the auto industry, of banks, AIG, and home owners, it’s high damn time the Democratic PR machine was rescued as well!

Associated Press

Struggling newspapers should be allowed to operate as nonprofits similar to public broadcasting stations, Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., proposed Tuesday.

Cardin introduced a bill that would allow newspapers to choose tax-exempt status. They would no longer be able to make political endorsements, but could report on all issues including political campaigns.

Cardin has dubbed this idiocy the “Newspaper Revitalization Act”.

My first question (which I quickly realized was a stupid question) was why should a dying medium be saved? Newspapers are dying for a reason, the medium has been replaced.

Ever heard of this thingy called the internet?

I realized the question I had asked myself was a stupid question given that the vast majority of print media is a cog in the Democratic PR machine.

The AP story notes that political endorsements would no longer be allowed.

Lets be honest, do newspapers really need to make an actual endorsement for it’s readers to know what person, what legislation that particular newspaper finds preferential?

Will the government force objectivity upon any newspapers which choose to take part in this revitalization act?

Advertising and subscription revenue would be tax exempt, and contributions to support news coverage or operations could be tax deductible.

Imagine Moveon DOT org providing contributions to a newspaper. What do you suppose that papers lean might be? What kind of “news” might they disseminate.

Truth be told, I wouldn’t want the conservative equivalent of Moveon DOT org to contribute to a ‘non-profit’ newspaper either. Of course, there is no such conservative equivalent.

I know it’s the dream of a simpleton, but I’d prefer a newspaper simply report facts. Perhaps, speaking strictly for myself, I’d still read a newspaper from time to time if I knew I could pick one up and be presented facts rather than assaulted by spin and opinion.

Likely not though…

because of this thing called the internet.

Serious consideration should also be given to the dangers of newspapers being fully under the thumb of the federal government. 

Perhaps Cardin already gave that some consideration previous to proposing this legislation.

 

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